Taking your office outside: The garden office

Since 2020, the practice of working from home has become more-or-less established. For many, it’s a preferred option, and there’s no going back to the way things were. For others, a kind of hybrid workspace strikes a nice balance, with a few working hours each month taking place in a dedicated office space, and the rest in a home work environment. A garden office can transform your work live balance.

In either case, it’s increasingly important that homes come equipped with dedicated office space – which is why so many homeowners are converting spare bedrooms into offices. But this isn’t the only option available: if you have a spare shed or other outbuilding available, then you might take your work to the bottom of the garden. This option presents several advantages.

Work-Home separation

When your office is in a separate building to your main residence, then you’ll more easily be able to strike that all-important work-life balance. When you leave the office for the day, you won’t suffer any temptation to head back later in the evening.

Quiet and private

If you live in a busy household, with lots of noise and distraction in the form of children, pets, and blaring television sets, then even a small amount of seclusion can be invaluable. An office in the garden achieves this neatly. You’ll always be contactable in an emergency, and you’ll be able to install a doorbell speaker so that you can get many of the same benefits as if you were still in the main home.

No room in the main home

If you literally don’t have the space to accommodate an office in your main building, then going for an outbuilding might be the only sensible option. It’s a major upgrade over working using a laptop in the living room or kitchen, as it’ll give you the distraction-free environment you need to attain truly deep levels of focus.

Creating an outdoor office

You can call in a professional company to set up your outdoor office, but it’s something that you can DIY with a little bit of forethought and skill.

You’ll need to consider the foundations first, and work your way upward. Having a solid base to work from is essential – and if you already have a suitable shed in place, this might be able to be converted. From there, try thinking about the structural elements, including any insulation to ensure the space can be kept warm. After all, you want the building to be habitable all year round. Of vital importance is the building being water-tight, especially if there’s expensive equipment in there. Think about using bitumen paint to seal tricky areas around the roof.

One thing that might require the intervention of a professional is the electrical supply, which may be threaded under your garden itself. This is something worth considering in advance, especially if your shed is very far away from the main building. Electrics can also be somewhat expensive so try and budget in advance for this.

Take a look at my DIY garden office post for some inspiration: How to build a garden office from scratch – on a budget

garden view

Try some of my other great posts for further reading and inspiration:

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